Change of Doctor


#1

My current Doctor is leaving the practice where she’s located and moving to another part of the city (about 40 mins further) to open up her own clinic. I’ve decided to switch to a new doctor and was fortunate enough to find a very competent Doctor who was trained locally and has no plans to relocate. Is this an issue for me with regards to dealing with the insurance company and can it give them cause to further create more stress by sidestepping their responsibility?


#2

I would think it depends on how long you’ve had LTD and how often the insurance company requests medical updates and how familiar the new doctor is with your medical condition.


#3

I haven’t successfully collected LTD. I’m in the litigation process just now and was just seeking out others who’ve had similar experiences with having changed docs.


#4

Wish you the best in the litigation! My husband is self rep’d and of course they are filing the motions :slight_smile:

Always a journey


#5

Thanks, it certainly is a journey and a frustrating one too. I don’t want to give in but it’s becoming more and more difficult to deal with these jerk. I want my life back but it’s out of my control. I can only push on but it’s hard to stay positive.


#6

I view a person’s choice of a doctor to be a very personal decision and not to be dictated by insurance companies. All things being equal…from a disability claims point of view…it is better to keep the same doctor as long as possible because he or she knows you better and can speak to the evolution of your disability over time. Also, sometimes new doctors will refuse to speak about your level of disability because they don’t know you well enough. However, the opposite can be true as well. A newer doctor can be better informed about your illness and lack bias so he or she can give more informed commentary and reports regarding your disability. There is no right answer here other than all things being equal I advise people to keep the same doctor whenever possible…but in life, all things are rarely equal.


David Brannen

Disability Lawyer with Resolute Legal

The response posted above is based on the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliabile manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with a lawyer, fully explain your situation, and allow the lawyer enough time to research the applicable law and facts required to give an adequate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full one-on-one discussion with a lawyer should be done before taking any any action. The information posted on this forum is available to the viewing public and is not intended to create a lawyer client relationship with any person. If you want one-on-one advice, please click here to request a free consultation or call toll free 1-877-282-5188 to speak with a member with our disability claim support team.


#7

Thanks for the response David and what you state makes sense, however in my circumstance my previous Dr. was trained in the Middle East and while pleasant, attentive and helpful she had very little knowledge of mental health issues particularly PTSD as well as a bit of a language barrier. If not for my wife (who is a trained OT / mental health clinician) I would probably continued to follow her to her new practice. Having said that my new Dr., following an introductory interview, certainly appeared to have more extensive knowledge regarding mental health issues and was immediately setting up appointments to bring her up to date as well as connecting me to other professionals. My only concern was how the insurance company would view this change and would it have a negative impact on my claim.


#8

My experience is that most insurance companies will see it for what it is – legitimate reasons for changing doctors and they won’t take issue with it as long as you have continuity in care. If the new doctor has you on a better treatment plan, the insurer will actually be happy to see this. The only time they view this is negative is if there is no continuity of care of if there is a sense you are not following the reasonable recommendations of your current doctor and are changing because your doctor supports the insurer’s view that you are not as disabled as you say you are…I don’t mean you specifically, but am speaking in general terms. From what you are describing this is a totally legit situation and I would be surprised if the insurer took any issue with it.


David Brannen

Disability Lawyer with Resolute Legal

The response posted above is based on the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliabile manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with a lawyer, fully explain your situation, and allow the lawyer enough time to research the applicable law and facts required to give an adequate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full one-on-one discussion with a lawyer should be done before taking any any action. The information posted on this forum is available to the viewing public and is not intended to create a lawyer client relationship with any person. If you want one-on-one advice, please click here to request a free consultation or call toll free 1-877-282-5188 to speak with a member with our disability claim support team.


#9

Hi yes, in fact the insurer will take issue with any change in doctor, any history prior to the new doctor the insurer will give a hard time regarding any history needed to be discussed or rectified prior to the new doctor however, on appeal is when it can be straightened out with a simple basic note from your new doctor letting the insurer know that they are fully aware and up-to-date on all of your prior medical dealings with prior doctors. To be clearer, if the new doctor does not mention to the insurer that they are aware and what they are aware of with your prior medical history the insurer will even sometimes state as they did in my boyfriend’s case, “your doctor was not involved at the time”. The rest should be self-explanatory.