Certified mail inbox : Emails deleted by insurance

Hi, I just wanted to recommend that if your communications with the insurance company are done via secure/certified emails stored in their own system, you should save each and every email/attachment in your own computer.

ALL of my communications with the insurance company are done via email. I just had 2 years worth of communications and documents suddenly disappear from the secure inbox and my new (4th or 5th since May 2021) case manager just advised me that emails are deleted from the inbox “after a certain amount of time”.

No one ever mentioned this to me, which is pretty important. Since the entirety (almost) of the emails were purged at once, it’s not like an automatic deadline based on the emails date, they seem to go in and delete everything. They left only the very last email I had received.

I’d saved up until May or June 2021 but missed everything since then. Had tons of important info, like who to contact to get a copy of my file to get a copy of those emails back. It sucks. And it’s ridiculous. I’m tempted to use my own email account from now on. At least I’ll have a copy of outgoing messages and only have to save the incoming.

Anyway, save everything in your computer. They can and do wipe emails from your secure inbox.

And honestly, I’m getting so sick of the revolving door of case managers. Got lucky and had the same person who was amazing for almost a full year. Since then, they’ve assigned 4 different people. It’s like starting over each time.

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Yes, use your own email account (even replies to items sent to you via their secure system) and make pdfs of each exchange as a double back up.

Wow that’s fast deleting current emails as well. Make sure you get a written record that that’s what happened. I guess the good news is that they must not be contemplating being able to get you off of your benefits any time soon or they would have kept it for litigation.

Great advice, thank you!

Hi Caro, thanks for your reply. I’m wondering if you could explain what you mean:

Also, is the case managers reply saying they delete the emails after a certain amount of time good enough or I should be seeking something more in writing?

Thanks!

I requested a copy of my file. It’s all there. It was amazing what they sent me (helps me in my civil suit against my former employer mind you). They have to provide any and all documents/notes/scraps of info/internal emails. Medical info goes to your doctor on file (she just gives them to me as she has her own files)

I’ve requested my file a few times over the years. They pick up the next request on the date the last one left off.

I agree. Ive requested 2 or 3 times but there are so many pages oof that’s why I try to keep everything documented individually as well.

The email reply is good enough, I wasn’t sure if they had told you on the phone.

Re the other thing when companies are expecting a dispute that might end up in court they start preserving evidence for later, so if they didn’t preserve the evidence then it’s safe to assume they aren’t expecting a dispute.

Stay on your toes…call me cynical, but if their plan is to cut you off, then it would be in the LTD insurers best interest to blow away the correspondance from the correspondence server to further frustrate a claimant and make a claimant feel like they don’t have the information they need to fight against a denial. I personally believe LTD insurers use these databases to control the situation since most denied claimants have no idea they can use a legal claim instead of internal “appeals” to get their benefits reinstated.

For litigation purposes the correspondence database may have been purged, but their claimant file database tracking all correspondence should have all this info still intact. If I were you, I’d asked for a copy of my complete file since you can’t access the correspondence anymore. If your claim file doesn’t show your correspondence or they only kept the correspondance that favors them then I’d raise hell. I trust insurance companies as far as I can throw them, and as I’m a bit crippled that’s not very far.